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The Chosen Season 4 Episode 5: Recap, Review, & Analysis

Updated: Feb 27

With The Chosen slated for seven seasons of eight episodes, Episode 5 of Season 4 officially transitions us into the second half of the show. The transition is pronounced. In the first half of the season, Jesus’ ministry was centered around Capernaum. In Episode 5, Jesus sets his face toward Jerusalem and steps onto the long, difficult road that ultimately leads to the cross. Up until this point in the show, Jesus has faced sporadic persecution and an ominous edict, but Episode 5 marks the beginning of the premeditated plot that will actually result in his execution. Not coincidentally, the episode also sets Judas on the trajectory that will culminate in him betraying Jesus for silver. Suffice to say, there’s a lot to unpack. Below, I’ll detail what exactly happens in Season 4 Episode 5 and then go on to share my thoughts on the episode and its key themes.


[You can find my recap, review, and analysis of Episode 4 here and Episode 6 here]


The disciples and Roman soldiers in The Chosen Season 4 Episode 5
The disciples and Roman soldiers in The Chosen Season 4 Episode 5

What Happened in The Chosen Season 4 Episode 5

Episode 5 followed two main storylines:


Jesus, Judas, & the Disciples

As Episode 5 begins, the disciples are on the road. They encounter a courier, who provides them with a mysterious package. The disciples are suspicious and unsure of what to make of the mysterious box. Eventually they open it and discover various treasures that Joanna has sent to support their ministry. Liquidating each item will take too long for one person, so Judas distributes an item to each disciple, including Matthew, even though he’s still wracked with self-doubt due to his past financial sins. Peter assures Matthew that the group trusts him indefinitely and they all split up.


When the disciples reconvene, they’ve accumulated a large sum from selling the various items. As they are approaching Jerusalem, they have to decide where they will stay. Judas wants to use the money to stay in an actual inn - and John suggests they could do so by using fake names. Simon Z’s brother probably still lives in Jerusalem but it’s unlikely he has a large home. Some disciples are hesitant about reaching out to Nicodemus, even though Mary assures them that he has an open heart. When Jesus finally arrives, he explains they will stay in Bethany with his friends, Lazarus, Mary, and Martha.


On the road to Bethany, however, a cohort of Roman soldiers accosts the disciples and force them to carry their armor and baggage. It’s a outrageously humiliating experience - particularly given how rudely the soldiers treat Jesus, Mary Magdalene, and Tamar. Still, Jesus urges the disciples to remain calm. This exhortation seems lost on Judas, who can’t help but seethe. When they finally reach the next mile marker - the farthest they can be forced to go under Roman law - the soldiers prepare to take back their armor, but Jesus keeps going. He explains that they can only be forced to go a mile but they will voluntarily go the additional mile to the Roman base. This act of radical generosity shames the Romans into taking back their helmets and some of the heavier items. While Philip recalls Jesus’ teaching on going the extra mile (Matthew 5:41), Jesus’ moral victory seems lost on Judas, who remains furious.


After retreading the two miles in order to reclaim their bags, the disciples resume their journey to Bethany. As they draw near, Jesus gives Judas permission to go see his friend, Hadad (who also lives in Bethany) after they finish eating together. They are soon met by Mary of Bethany, who is overjoyed to see Jesus.


Inside Lazarus’ home, we see Martha tidying up with furious intensity. When Lazarus comes out to greet Jesus, he briefly feigns outrage over the imposition but soon embraces his friend with laughter. Martha is immediately on the ball, serving Jesus and the disciples, while Mary accompanies the group in to sit down. 


As they sit, Jesus tells the Parable of the Laborers in the Vineyard (Matthew 20:1-16), in which a Master hires several successive waves of laborers, promising a denarius in pay, those who were hired first balk at how the Master offers the same pay to those who were hired last. Jesus explains that the calculus of God’s kingdom can seem unfair, since it isn’t measured based on merit. During the parable, Martha tries to eye-nudge Mary to get up and help, but Mary remains blissfully unaware, focused solely on Jesus’ teaching. 


Finally, Martha has enough and urges Jesus to make her sister help. Jesus explains to Martha that her service and the food she makes is all wonderful, but the best way to serve him is to listen to his words. Martha’s food will pass away; Mary has chosen to focus on the food that doesn’t pass away - Jesus’ teaching - and that portion won’t be taken from her. Still, he acknowledges that Mary probably could have helped a little - and Mary mouths an apology. Lazarus and Peter step up to serve the remainder of the food while Martha joins the group and the group begins to make music.


As the music plays, Jesus notices that Lazarus is hiding signs of some illness that is bothering him. Troubled, he leaves the room and encounters his mother, Mary of Nazareth. After giving Judas permission to go, Jesus and Mary spend time reminiscing on his childhood while Mary washes his hair. Jesus expresses frustration over his followers’ poor understanding - how they ask for earthly status and take offense when he shows deference to Rome. Mary points out that they’re only human - but Jesus points out that he is too. Mary knows all too well from all the dirty swaddles she changed. Still, Jesus is grieved at how his words are lost on the religious leaders and on the masses and even on his disciples who claim to follow him. The only way to make them understand will be bitter. Like Joseph taught him how to cut through example, he will need to show them and not merely teach. Jesus explains that he has already told the disciples what is coming but their desire to avoid difficult news has made them deaf.


While Jesus talks with Mary, Judas goes to the home of his mentor, Hadad. Hadad mocks how the disciples have no home and appear to be making no progress - having just been kicked out of a backwater town. Judas acknowledges that Jesus doesn’t understand the importance of perception. When Hadad hears how Ramah was killed by a Roman, he’s enraged by how Roman citizens can get off the hook with such minor consequences and insists that something has to happen soon. Based on his miracles and teachings, Judas is confident that Jesus is the Messiah, but he doesn’t understand why they aren’t moving quicker. 


When Hadad learns that Judas has been appointed treasurer, he urges him to set aside more for himself, given the special skill set that he’s offering. At first, Judas is offended at this suggestion, but he ultimately admits his faith is shaking. Hadad comforts him with the thought that he will one day be Secretary of the Messiah’s Treasury - but insists that until then, it’s responsible to make sure he’s taking care of himself. He also encourages Judas to use his position to pressure Jesus into action.


As the disciples prepare to leave Lazarus’ home, we see Judas acting on Hadad’s words, taking money for himself from the purse of the disciples.


Judas in The Chosen Season 4
Judas in The Chosen Season 4

Shmuel, Yussif, & the Sanhedrin

After the opening titles, we join Shmuel, Yanni, and another rabbi (Zebediah) at the Sanhedrin as he participates in a vigorous debate with the Sadducees over whether the Hebrew Scriptures promise resurrection and eternal life. The Sadducees insist that eternal life is nothing more than obeying the commandments and the prophecies about resurrection are nothing more than metaphors for the renewal of the nation of Israel. The Pharisees question whether the Sadducees are too rich and comfortable in this life and that’s why they find no use for the promise of resurrection.


Yussif arrives in the midst of the debate and is greeted by Shmuel, who immediately realizes that he must have leveraged his father’s wealth and influence to buy a seat. Yussif insists they both used the means they had in order to lay ahold of a seat. Shmuel concedes this point and wonders what Yussif will do with his newfound influence.


Later, Shmuel orients Yussif to the various factions in the Sanhedrin: striving lawyers who are hoping to secure favor, Hellenized Herodians who want to push the Jews toward more compromise, Pharisees of Hillel, who tend to favor more lenient interpretations of the Law, and Pharisees of Shammai, who tend to favor more literal and stringent interpretations. 


As the Sanhedrin gathers, one of the leaders, Gederah, explains that Rome’s attitude toward the Jews is shifting. Pilate’s recent acts of cruelty have gone too far and the Emperor Tiberias is not happy. Pilate needs to maintain peace in order to remain in the Emperor’s good graces. The Sanhedrin can take advantage of the tenuous situation and force Pilate to do what they want. Yussif almost stands to oppose this cynicism but is stopped by Shmuel, who explains he has no leverage as the newest member. If Yussif wants to change things, he needs to do so through a committee or a short-term work group. After listening to a long and boring list of committees, Yussif’s ears perk up at the mention of a group focused on studying prophecies made in Babylon and determining which have been realized and which remain unfulfilled.


Shmuel goes on to introduce Yussif to several Pharisees. Unfortunately, the head of the prophecy group is offended at the connection between Yussif’s father and a rival. Yussif is also introduced to Lahad, a Pharisee on a committee that hopes to regain control of Beersheba, which was originally included in the borders of Israel in the Torah. As they talk, Lahad reveals that he’s plotting to get Jesus executed in order to draw attention to his cause. This news - and the utter cynicism of Lahad - horrifies Yussif.


Review of The Chosen Season 4 Episode 5

Episode 5 had some really bright moments:

  • The concretized depiction of going the extra mile was well done - and a powerful illustration of the costs and rewards of following Jesus’ teaching.

  • I think the episode nailed its depiction of the Mary/Martha dynamic, and I appreciated the nuance that was added to Jesus’ response.

  • I like that we got to see Shmuel in his element, doing what he does best as an interpreter of Scripture, defending his interpretation against a lesser interpretation.

  • I also liked the dynamic between Shmuel and Yussif - it went a long way to humanize Shmuel’s character.

  • Jesus’ conversation with Mary was also poignant and humanizing - as their conversations tend to be.

  • In general, I felt most of the Judas/Hadad conversation felt believable, even if I feel like it could have been set up better.


I do think there were several flaws in the episode:

  • At times, I found my attention waning. In part, I wonder if this was due to the decision to release Episodes 4-6 in a single theatrical sitting. Three hours of television is a long time, even with a five minute intermission. It’s not even the same as watching a three hour movie, because a movie is designed to be viewed in a single sitting, while each of these episodes were designed to be experienced individually.

  • I also think the episode could have benefitted from more stringent editing. There were several points that felt unnecessary or too long - particularly in the Sanhedrin plot. I get that the show is setting up the factions and dynamics that Jesus will encounter in Jerusalem, but there just wasn’t a strong plot guiding Yussif’s story.

  • I also question why the show is introducing even more Pharisees as the architects of the plan to assassinate Jesus. It seems like we already had plenty of Pharisees to keep track of, especially given how little time is spent on the storyline. I don’t know why the plot couldn’t have been hatched by existing players (e.g. Yanni).

  • As I hinted above, I think Judas’ turn could have been set up a little bit better. The show has done some work to establish Judas’ frame of mind, but I think Judas probably should have suffered at least one other indignity/frustration directly tied to Jesus.


Key Themes of The Chosen Season 4 Episode 5

Episode 5 is defined by several rich thematic tensions:


Worldly Priorities vs. Kingdom Priorities

Episode 5 illuminates the contrast between the goals and practices of this world and those that characterize the kingdom that Jesus is bringing. As Jesus talks to his mother, Mary, at the end of the episode, we see how he’s growing exasperated at human resistance to the Kingdom vision that he is teaching. As he points out, this resistance is present everywhere - among the religious leaders of his people, among the masses, and even among his followers, who claim to be committed to his teachings. Mary initially frames it as a human issue, but Jesus points out that he is human too. Still, he recognizes that in a broken world, simply teaching a different way is not enough. Something more (the bitter reality of the cross) is needed to bring real transformation.


The actual the divide between worldly priorities and kingdom priorities takes on at least two forms, which we see play out across both Episodes 5 and 6:


Earthly Pragmatism vs. Focusing on Jesus’ Teaching

Since his introduction, Judas has been characterized as creative and pragmatic in his approach to supporting the ministry of Jesus. He isn’t content simply to stand on the sidelines and follow orders; he sees possibilities and wants to make use of these opportunities in order to advance the work of Jesus. Most of the other disciples have a more passive approach; they take the present circumstances of ministry as a given, under the assumption that if Jesus wanted to change things, he would. Episodes 5 and 6 really highlight this contrast and how it causes Judas to feel alienated and misunderstood by the other disciples.


As someone with a more entrepreneurial bent, I actually found myself sympathizing more with Judas than with the other disciples, which is an interesting place to be in. Is it wrong to approach ministry with a sense of creativity and pragmatism? Should we passively accept the way things are, under the assumption that, if Jesus wants to change things, he will? Given all the creativity and entrepreneurial passion that must have gone into getting The Chosen off the ground, I don’t think that’s the message that we’re meant to take away. As the story of Judas continues to play out, I suspect that we’ll realize that Jesus had a plan that would have put his creativity and problem-solving to good use. And perhaps we’ll also see how the other disciples could benefit from sometimes being less passive in their approach.


Still, there are real temptations and challenges that come with being a creative. This is a major theme in Tolkien as well (Melkor, Aule, Sauron, Feanor, Celebrimbor, Saruman) and I’m glad to see The Chosen exploring it. As Judas demonstrates, it’s not always easy to determine whether we are solving problems for the sake of advancing the kingdom or whether we are actually motivated by a lack of faith and/or a desire for ease and convenience. It’s also easy to be so consumed with our own ambitions and our plans for God’s kingdom that we miss God’s actual purposes and desires. Judas’ conversation with Hadad in Episode 5 and his conversations with the disciples and Jesus in Episode 6 bring these tensions into the light.


The famous story of Martha provides an additional perspective on this tension and insight into what Judas could be doing differently. Like Judas, Martha is a very pragmatic figure who wants to serve Jesus by improving conditions and using her skills and hard work. Just as Judas gets frustrated with the mindset of the other disciples, Martha gets frustrated with the passivity of her sister, Mary. When she finally expresses her frustration to Jesus, he responds not by invalidating her hard work or what she’s trying to contribute but rather by reorienting her priorities. Food and drink are valuable and good, but they are also temporary and peripheral. Jesus encourages Martha to let his words of everlasting life be her chief focus and priority, even if it comes at the cost of pragmatic concerns like food and drink. At the same time, he encourages Mary to be aware of the efforts of her sister and to do her fair part.


When Judas finally approaches Jesus about his frustrations in Episode 6, Jesus’ advice echoes his advice to Martha. Instead of focusing solely on earthly conditions and his own plans and creative solutions, Jesus wants Judas’ attention focused on his words. We see this deficiency in Judas earlier during the Roman encounter, when Judas fails to focus on Jesus’ teaching about going the extra mile and instead focuses on how he thinks Jesus should deal with the Romans. Going forward, Jesus urges Judas to pay attention to his Good Shepherd teaching. Again, Judas fails by focusing on how to deal with the Pharisees instead of Jesus’ actual teaching.


Cynical Self-Interest vs. Generous Service

There’s another tension present within Episode 5 that’s related to but distinct from the tension between pragmatism and focusing on Jesus’ words. One side of this tension comes out through Yussif’s experience of Sanhedrin. As Shmuel introduces Yussif to various members and religious factions, there’s an uncomfortable reality that crops up again and again. Many of the religious leaders are too focused on their power and status - to the point that they are willing to pursue it even at the cost of others. The Pharisees themselves can see this dynamic at work in the Sadducees, whom they accuse of being too focused on their own comfort and power. And yet the Sadducees clearly aren’t the only faction implicated. The plan to use Pilate’s precarious position to advance a political agenda is completely cynical. The Herodians and the Lawyers also seemed to be guided primarily by self-interest. But obviously the biggest display of a cynical mindset is seen in the plot to execute Jesus - not for his teaching but simply in order to draw attention to the cause of redrawing the borders of Judea.


 Worldly Priorities vs. Kingdom Priorities Episode 5 illuminates the contrast between the goals and practices of this world and those that characterize the kingdom that Jesus is bringing. As Jesus talks to his mother, Mary, at the end of the episode, we see how he’s growing exasperated at human resistance to the Kingdom vision that he is teaching. As he points out, this resistance is present everywhere - among the religious leaders of his people, among the masses, and even among his followers, who claim to be committed to his teachings. Mary initially frames it as a human issue, but Jesus points out that he is human too. Still, he recognizes that in a sinful world, simply teaching a different way is not enough. Something more (the bitter reality of the cross) is needed to bring real transformation.  The actual manifestation of the divide between worldly priorities and kingdom priorities takes on at least two forms in Episode 5:  Earthly Pragmatism vs. Focusing on Jesus’ Teaching Since his introduction, Judas has been characterized as creative and pragmatic in his approach to supporting the ministry of Jesus. He isn’t content simply to stand on the sidelines and follow orders; he sees possibilities and wants to make use of these opportunities in order to advance the work of Jesus. Most of the other disciples have a more passive approach; they take the present circumstances of ministry as a given, under the assumption that if Jesus wanted to change things, he would. Episodes 5 and 6 really highlight this contrast and how it causes Judas to feel alienated and misunderstood by the other disciples.  As someone with a more entrepreneurial bent, I actually found myself sympathizing more with Judas than with the other disciples, which is an interesting place to be in. Is it wrong to approach ministry with a sense of creativity and pragmatism? Should we passively accept the way things are, under the assumption that, if Jesus wants to change things, he will? Given all the creativity and entrepreneurial passion that must have gone into getting The Chosen off the ground, I don’t think that’s the message that we’re meant to take away. As the story of Judas continues to play out, I suspect that we’ll realize that Jesus had a plan that would have put his creativity and problem-solving to good use. And perhaps we’ll also see how the other disciples could benefit from sometimes being less passive in their approach.  Still, there are real temptations and challenges that come with being a creative. This is a major theme in Tolkien as well (Melkor, Aule, Sauron, Feanor, Celebrimbor, Saruman) and I’m glad to see The Chosen exploring it. As Judas demonstrates, it’s not always easy to determine whether we are solving problems for the sake of advancing the kingdom or whether we are actually motivated by a lack of faith and/or a desire for ease and convenience. It’s also easy to be so consumed with our own ambitions and our plans for God’s kingdom that we miss God’s actual purposes and desires. Judas’ conversation with Hadad in Episode 5 and his conversations with the disciples and Jesus in Episode 6 bring these tensions into the light.  The famous story of Martha provides an additional perspective on this tension and insight into what Judas could be doing differently. Like Judas, Martha is a very pragmatic figure who wants to serve Jesus by improving conditions and using her skills and hard work. Just as Judas gets frustrated with the mindset of the other disciples, Martha gets frustrated with the passivity of her sister, Mary. When she finally expresses her frustration to Jesus, he responds not by invalidating her hard work or what she’s trying to contribute but rather by reorienting her priorities. Food and drink are valuable and good, but they are also temporary and peripheral. Jesus encourages Martha to let his words of everlasting life be her chief focus and priority, even if it comes at the cost of pragmatic concerns like food and drink. At the same time, he encourages Mary to be aware of the efforts of her sister and to do her fair part.  When Judas finally approaches Jesus about his frustrations in Episode 6, Jesus’ advice echoes his advice to Martha. Instead of focusing solely on earthly conditions and his own plans and creative solutions, Jesus wants Judas’ attention focused on his words. We see this deficiency in Judas earlier during the Roman encounter, when Judas fails to focus on Jesus’ teaching about going the extra mile and instead focuses on how he thinks Jesus should deal with the Romans. Going forward, Jesus urges Judas to pay attention to his Good Shepherd teaching. Again, Judas fails by focusing on how to deal with the Pharisees instead of Jesus’ actual teaching.   Cynical Self-Interest vs. Generous Service There’s another tension present within Episode 5 that’s related to but distinct from the tension between pragmatism and focusing on Jesus’ words. One side of this tension comes out through Yussif’s experience of Sanhedrin. As Shmuel introduces Yussif to various members and religious factions, there’s an uncomfortable reality that crops up again and again. Many of the religious leaders are too focused on their power and status - to the point that they are willing to pursue it even at the cost of others. The Pharisees themselves can see this dynamic at work in the Sadducees, whom they accuse of being too focused on their own comfort and power. And yet the Sadducees clearly aren’t the only faction implicated. The plan to use Pilate’s precarious position to advance a political agenda is completely cynical. The Herodians and the Lawyers also seemed to be guided primarily by self-interest. But obviously the biggest display of a cynical mindset is seen in the plot to execute Jesus - not for his teaching but simply in order to draw attention to the cause of redrawing the borders of Judah.  This willingness to use others as tools for personal advancement can also be seen in the Roman soldiers who commandeer the disciples as if they were nothing more than pack animals. Through the disciples, we see the humiliation and anger that such a dehumanizing approach to others can cause. But in Jesus we see the antidote. Instead of striking back in order regain his own sense of power and dignity, Jesus responds to the cynical actions of the Romans by generously offering to go above and beyond what is required in his service to them. This radical generosity helps the Romans see Jesus and his disciples as humans with agency, and this recognition shames them into reconsidering their ways.   There is also a touch of cynical self-interest in Martha’s approach to Mary. She isn’t focused on Mary’s well-being; instead she just sees Mary as an unutilized resource that would make her work easier.   Judas initially doesn’t seem too consumed with self-interest - he genuinely seems focused on advancing the ministry of Jesus. But Hadad, drawing on Judas’ sense of uncertainty and doubt, encourages him to adopt a more cynical approach to Jesus - as a tool for his own self-advancement. It doesn’t take long for Judas to give in to this temptation. Judas’ desire for security and for compensation for his effort is certainly understandable, but if he really feels entitled to additional compensation, he should bring that desire to Jesus. Simply taking from the pot that the entire group is relying on strips Jesus and the other disciples of their agency and human dignity.  In contrast to the cynical self-interest of this world, Jesus is characterized by radical generosity. His parable of the laborers reveals that he gives, not based on a calculation of the value/worth that others can offer to him but rather out of his own overflowing abundance. This mindset is also manifested in the Good Shepherd speech in Episode 6. As the Good Shepherd, he does not protect the sheep out of cynical self-interest. That may be how robbers (like the Sadducees) or hired hands (like Judas) act. But Jesus is so committed to protecting his sheep and giving them an abundant life that he is willing to lay down his own life. In turn, he trusts that the abundant generosity of his Father will overflow and raise him back up. And so perhaps the reason why Jesus has forced the disciples to live so simply. Instead of seeking more funds and resources, he wants to see if, like their Shepherd, they are willing to lay down their own well-being for the sake of the sheep - while trusting in God’s radical abundance and generosity to fill them back up.
Shmuel, Yussif, and Jairus in The Chosen Season 4

This willingness to use others as tools for personal advancement can also be seen in the Roman soldiers who commandeer the disciples as if they were nothing more than pack animals. Through the disciples, we see the humiliation and anger that such a dehumanizing approach to others can cause. But in Jesus we see the antidote. Instead of striking back in order regain his own sense of power and dignity, Jesus responds to the cynical actions of the Romans by generously offering to go above and beyond what is required in his service to them. This radical generosity helps the Romans see Jesus and his disciples as humans with agency, and this recognition shames them into reconsidering their ways. 


There is also a touch of cynical self-interest in Martha’s approach to Mary. She isn’t focused on Mary’s well-being; instead she just sees Mary as an un-utilized resource that would make her work easier. 


Judas initially doesn’t seem too consumed with self-interest - he genuinely seems focused on advancing the ministry of Jesus. But Hadad, drawing on Judas’ sense of uncertainty and doubt, encourages him to adopt a more cynical approach to Jesus - as a tool for his own self-advancement. It doesn’t take long for Judas to give in to this temptation. Judas’ desire for security and for compensation for his effort is certainly understandable, but if he really feels entitled to additional compensation, he should bring that desire to Jesus. Simply taking from the pot that the entire group is relying on strips Jesus and the other disciples of their agency and human dignity.


In contrast to the cynical self-interest of this world, Jesus is characterized by radical generosity. His parable of the laborers reveals that he gives, not based on a calculation of the value/worth that others can offer to him but rather out of his own overflowing abundance. This mindset is also manifested in the Good Shepherd speech in Episode 6. As the Good Shepherd, he does not protect the sheep out of cynical self-interest. That may be how robbers (like the Sadducees) or hired hands (like Judas) act. But Jesus is so committed to protecting his sheep and giving them an abundant life that he is willing to lay down his own life. In turn, he trusts that the abundant generosity of his Father will overflow and raise him back up. And so perhaps the reason why Jesus has forced the disciples to live so simply. Instead of seeking more funds and resources, he wants to see if, like their Shepherd, they are willing to lay down their own well-being for the sake of the sheep - while trusting in God’s radical abundance and generosity to fill them back up.


Did I miss any key themes? Or could I nuance my analysis or review more? Leave your thoughts below in the comments!


 

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If you liked this post, you might want to check out some of my other posts on The Chosen and Bible adaptation. I have Bible studies/discussion guides for each episode of The Chosen Seasons 1-4, blogs exploring how The Chosen adapts key biblical figures, and articles exploring the controversial nature of adaptation. I hope you enjoy them!


The Chosen Season 4


The Chosen Season 3


Adapting Biblical Characters Series


Artist Interviews (The Bible Artist Podcast)


Exploring The Chosen with Youth or Small Group [Discussion Guides]

Season 4

Season 3

Season 2

Season 1

Specials


The Chosen Controversies Series


How to Discuss The Chosen - and Why


Themes & Theology of The Chosen [Exclusive for BMC Members]

Season 4


Season 1

Specials


Mailbag Q&R


The Chosen Thematic Viewing Guides


Beyond The Chosen


Other Bible Adaptations